• Please use real names.

    Greetings to all who have registered to OPF and those guests taking a look around. Please use real names. Registrations with fictitious names will not be processed. REAL NAMES ONLY will be processed

    Firstname Lastname

    Register

    We are a courteous and supportive community. No need to hide behind an alia. If you have a genuine need for privacy/secrecy then let me know!
  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

Random pictures - Regularly updated - Juste pour le plaisir

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Handsome!

Can you explain the tubal structure. Is that around a sail? Do you have that from the side?

Also, the wide black around each of the windows? Is that a rubber gasket or what?
On top is what is called a "Park Avenue" boom. It is made of carbon fibre and the main sail is resting in it.

The roof structure is made of carbon fibre with rubber seal around the glass (for waterproofness and absorbing dilation due to heat during the day)

For other viewes, check-out the book! Livre Chrisco
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Such a beautiful work of vision art and engineering!

1. The book is magnificent. I hope there might be a copy left!

2. I am very interested in the fore sail design that seems to have two versions. One appears to be a narrower gray and the other, so colorful and flamboyant, is far wider and can be set almost 90 degrees to the bow-stern axis!

560D2788-5B8A-4BA6-B4EC-D33301482B8C.jpeg


3. Can that sail every cross over to starboard side, as it would appear to get stopped by the main mast?

4. How is the foresail supported? Is there merely a cable built into the leading edge of that sail and when that is Pulled extraordinarily tight, essentially a new “mast” is formed?

To swing it starboard, how does one get the wind to cooperate? How does one get past the mast when the sail is so wide at the base?

5. Where are the sails stowed when they are dropped?

6. Is the two part “skeleton” keel a recent design?

7. Do sailors ever have to climb the mast at sea? Or can the cables for the foresail by simply cranked up the from of the main mast by a motor?

Sorry for so many questions but I may want to make a new art work with such sails! This is so grand and inspiring!

The loads on the mast and keel must be enormous!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Such a beautiful work of vision art and engineering!

This is a 14 million $ yacht…

1. The book is magnificent. I hope there might be a copy left!

It 1 100 copies have been printed… Just 2 of them are left…

2. I am very interested in the fore sail design that seems to have two versions. One appears to be a narrower gray and the other, so colorful and flamboyant, is far wider and can be set almost 90 degrees to the bow-stern axis!

On this category of boats they may have 10 different foresail, different shape, different make, depending of the weather and the angle with the wind

3. Can that sail every cross over to starboard side, as it would appear to get stopped by the main mast?

No, due to the forestay they have to drop it down before tacking (turning)

4. How is the foresail supported? Is there merely a cable built into the leading edge of that sail and when that is Pulled extraordinarily tight, essentially a new “mast” is formed?

There is a Kevlar rope embed which is never set to be straight, a certain curve is necessary

To swing it starboard, how does one get the wind to cooperate? How does one get past the mast when the sail is so wide at the base?

See reply to #3

5. Where are the sails stowed when they are dropped?

In the f'csle (large place in front, dedicated to ropes and sails)

6. Is the two part “skeleton” keel a recent design?

That was a recent design when the baot was built in 2012

7. Do sailors ever have to climb the mast at sea? Or can the cables for the foresail by simply cranked up the from of the main mast by a motor?

They do have to do that from time to time, the guy sit on a plank and get elevated with a halyard (rope or cable going up/down to the head of the mast, usually used to set the sails up) This halyard is driven by an electrical winch

Sorry for so many questions but I may want to make a new art work with such sails! This is so grand and inspiring!

The loads on the mast and keel must be enormous!

Dozen of tons!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
A little less than a year ago, Romain Claris and I started the shooting for our Exhibition "Un peu de rouge, pourtant" To our delight, the complicity of Salome Costagliola allowed us to illustrate our will to honour Takahama Kyoshi's Haiku.
Once the pictures were taken, I planted one of the peony plants to give it a new and quiet life on our terrace. Good for me! Here is our peony 2020, just blooming, which reminds me of Salome with a great but nevertheless modest satisfaction...
Shot with a #Pentax #645Z.

_NCZ6418_web.jpg


_NCZ6397_web.jpg


_NCZ6408_web.jpg


A detail of the above image (crop of the 100% size) :

_NCZ6408_web-detail.jpg
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
What is the name of this cultivar of peonie?
Pivoine de Chine 'Immaculée'
Paeonia lactiflora 'Immaculée'
I don't know the name in English, but if you Google Paeonia lactiflora 'Immaculée'
You'll see a lot! Or print a picture and show it to your local plant dealer.
The blooming is from May to June here, might be earlier in California…
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Nicolas,

you have aced it again!

These aerial pictures are spectacular, Nicolas and give me a lot of joy, but without having to be strapped into your little helicopter!

Do you have any video of these sails from above too.

I finf it so interesting that you have another sail above the gaff rugged sail!

....and then you have 3 foresails. Can they swop them for one large foresail like the one you showed previously, that can essential be almost at right angles to the fore-aft axis of the boat?

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Asher, when these boats were designed and buikt they were completely hand held with no mechanical help to handle the sails (up, down and set)…
Also I believe that the masts and their rigging couldn't afford the forces due to these huge sails. Spinakers and genakers arrived much later.

But hey, look at this beauty:


Note that it is not her original rig and sail plan.
The history of this world famous schooner built in 1850: Give it a read! it it’s a fabulous story! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America_(yacht)

Source: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classe_J_(yacht)
This work is from the Detroit Publishing Co. collection of the Bibliothèque du Congrès. According to the library, there are no known copyright restrictions on the use of this work.
Most of the images in this collection were published before 1925 and are therefore in the public domain in the United States. A few images were published after this date and may be restricted by copyright.
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Helicopter shots of a sailing vessel and macro shots of some flowers all in the same thread. It could get confusing.
Well Peter,
May I remind the title of the thread ?
"Random pictures - Regularly updated - Juste pour le plaisir"
I post in this thread new and old photos, that I like and pleased to share, you might soon see some other stuff like Châteaux (wineries) or people at work or some I don't even know now that I'll shot next week… Random!
 
Top