• Please use real names.

    Greetings to all who have registered to OPF and those guests taking a look around. Please use real names. Registrations with fictitious names will not be processed. REAL NAMES ONLY will be processed

    Firstname Lastname

    Register

    We are a courteous and supportive community. No need to hide behind an alia. If you have a genuine need for privacy/secrecy then let me know!
  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

Road Art: pavement, walls anything unusually artistic by chance or intent!

Cedric's picture of a car wash floor is a great stimulus for us to find images that decorate our rooad ways and paths. Often they are painted formally, as in Cedric's discovery here or else they might be painted murals or on the side of a building or fence.





Show yours!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Michael Nagel

Active member
Street Art is one of my favorite subjects with a constantly growing collection.
Until now, however, I only found one painted on the ground, here it is:



I have quite a few murals and I will add them if this is OK.

Best regards,
Michael
 

StuartRae

New member
A little more from the streets of Munich:
Best regards,
Michael
Hi Michael,

I love street art, and these are exceptional.

I used to regularly take the train to London for business meetings, and the approach to Paddington station was littered with graffiti. Some people would call it vandalism, but at this level it was art.

Are you familiar with Banksy? He started off as a grafitti artist and is now a folk hero.

Here's his website.

Regards,

Stuart
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Hi Stuart,

In Germany you will find more street art in Berlin, but the street art community in Munich is quite good.

Sure I know Banksy - obviously he has followers in Munich as you can see here:




As we are talking about plagiarism, here a street art commentary on this topic, starting with my preferred version followed by the complete view:




Best regards,
Michael
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Thanks Asher.

One motivation for me to document street art is its short-lived character. Much of it gets painted over, buildings are demolished or it gets simply replaced by other street art. There are, however, works that are preserved by the house owner like in the example below:


Eh?

As you can see in this photo taken the year before the version posted above and in the discussion below, somebody took care to preserve both works.

Best regards,
Michael
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Since we have been talking about Mondriaan in another thread, it seemed appropriate to share this one here.


Cem,

It's interesting that no attempt was made to incorporate the windows into the design, (except, it seems as an afterthought, on the lef)t. I wonder why?

What museum is that?

Asher
 

Cem_Usakligil

Active member
Cem,

It's interesting that no attempt was made to incorporate the windows into the design, (except, it seems as an afterthought, on the lef)t. I wonder why?

What museum is that?

Asher
Hi Asher,

This is just an alley wall, not a museum. The painting is graffiti so who knows why they did it like this. :)

@Michael: great concept, thanks for sharing.
 

Ruben Alfu

New member
Nice collection of art here! I'll go for something more traditional, but still in the same track of "road art".

This mural, based on Paul Gauguin's "Tahitian Women (On the Beach)", is painted on a wall in isla Taboga, Panama. In 1871 Gauguin made a pragmatic trip to Panama and during his short staying he visited Isla Taboga. The woman passing by the mural is a local "Tabogana woman".





Ruben Alfu : Gauguin on the wall

 

Cem_Usakligil

Active member
Hi Michael, Ruben,

Great additions both, I like them.

@Ruben: the facial expression of the woman passing by is almost a mirror of the woman on the left in the painting. They are both wearing the same white top. What a good catch indeed!

Here is yet another one from me. I hope I am not boring anybody, lol :


 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Cem,

I like the superhero/-villain mash-up. Usually I am more looking for stencil and sticker art, but this is the kind of street art at which you can look often and still discover new details.





Best regards,
Michael
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Great Work

Thanks Asher.

One motivation for me to document street art is its short-lived character. Much of it gets painted over, buildings are demolished or it gets simply replaced by other street art. There are, however, works that are preserved by the house owner like in the example below:


Eh?

As you can see in this photo taken the year before the version posted above and in the discussion below, somebody took care to preserve both works.

Best regards,
Michael
All really have done great job. Thanks to all for sharing your inspiring work.
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
This is all wondrous! Thanks everybody.

As each work of art is photographed, a new work of art is created.

Best regards,

Doug
 

jake klein

New member
I wish there was more street art here in Minnesota. It seems I'll have to go downtown looking!

for anyone interested in street art you should check out "Exit through the gift shop" an excellent documentary.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Michael,

I do like the stencils. They seem and efficient way of making one's mark and t's a branding too. However, this picture not only is fun, but is a reminder of Popeye the Sailor's girl Olive Oil!

Munich again:



and here's Olive Oil





Olive Oil copyright of image unknown


Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I like this but still not sure...


Jake,

I like it too! The two elements, pattern with repeats and then shadows and silhouettes makes a great motif under which to organize a project. I like the idea very much as it's so simple and has great potential. However, it's not there yet! This would make a great project. The stone itself, is art if you wish.

Asher
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Asher, thanks, yes - there is some relationship to Olive Oil, but I do not believe that this was intended.

Here are three examples of interaction between art and the environment.


The first one shows a smoking guy next to a sign. The translation means 'No smoking or open flame'



The next is a parody on a common ad for chocolate (at leas in Europe). Explanation on the ad here (German only, but the image should help).



I do not believe that the last one needs explanation.



Best regards,
Michael
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Ruben, the Legs shot is a great find!


These are from a pedestrian passage underneath a bridge in Munich. Isar is the name of the river flowing through Munich, more information here.

The four letters are not next to each other under the bridge, there are other graffiti in-between. Each letter is clickable for a larger version.


Please excuse the lack of precision in the alignment - I did not optimize the pictures for this kind alignment when uploading.

Best regards,
Michael
 
Top