• Please use real names.

    Greetings to all who have registered to OPF and those guests taking a look around. Please use real names. Registrations with fictitious names will not be processed. REAL NAMES ONLY will be processed

    Firstname Lastname

    Register

    We are a courteous and supportive community. No need to hide behind an alia. If you have a genuine need for privacy/secrecy then let me know!
  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

Road Art: pavement, walls anything unusually artistic by chance or intent!

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
A few recent catches.

This one is rather unusual, I almost did not see it:


Well Michael,

You were very lucky and observant. Was this on the ground or fixed on the wall. Note how the seam in one coincides with a line in the painted concrete! If that's indeed a wall, the artist is brilliant, LOL! Who's have thought!

Asher
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Well Michael,

You were very lucky and observant. Was this on the ground or fixed on the wall. Note how the seam in one coincides with a line in the painted concrete! If that's indeed a wall, the artist is brilliant, LOL! Who's have thought!

Asher
Hi Asher,

This was fixed on a wall, about at the height of my knee.

If there is one thing I have learned from documenting street art it is that if you want to see unusual art, you have also to look at unusual places.

The artist is brilliant and this is one of the unusual works I saw until now.

Best regards,
Michael
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Art Dialogue

Art Dialogue is pretty common in street art, here are three examples.


This is common style, but a nice idea:


I like the idea here. The skull is a common sticker in the part of Munich where I found this (without any modification). The man on the horse was cut into it. The sticker is pretty small, so this work demanded precision:


The speech bubble (normally empty) is also quite common. Placing the ninja inside really added to it:


The next one seems not to be art dialogue, but it could be. I like the surreal look:


Best regards,
Michael
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Cem,

This picture, like many of yours is far more significant than the first casual glance would allow. It tells us a lot about ourselves, even though we may not have the tools to interpret each fully.

We ask for introductions, but that's not always the best way to present images. I disagree with the aphorism that "Art should speak for itself!" There are sometimes such unique benefits in knowing about what one is going to see, but also the opposite. In the former case one has the rich background to interpret best the signals embedded by the photographer and also the background of what's being imaged.

In the absence of such information, the artist donates only the image for our eyes and forces us to draw on knowledge of his/her previous works, the siblings which will sometimes inform us of the signals embedded and the circumstances of that artists work. Otherwise, we are left to muse with our library of cultural experiences to draw on and either wander in that new world, or else move on.




Cem Usakligil: Untitled #!!

Here, you allow the pictures to speak for themselves as they are the art of presumably unknown others.

Well, interestingly, you again included many realities. There are 3 significant paintings and the one seen from the side has been painted over a previous mural.

The first image has a man about to climb a drain pipe or posing next to it. He has a party hat or in the U.K. perhaps a dunce's hat. Maybe he's a European figure that's well known or perhaps the artist himself? Anyway, I have no idea what it might mean. The picture on the side of the house is obviously significant by it's colors and size but that's all one can say. At the back wall, there's an interesting cartoon figure. I have no familiarity with this but it seems to be a comic book or cartoon figure that I've seen before.

These pictures, together, show both the respect that one artist gives another, finding their own spaces and also the fact that, like civilizations or plants, one picture may replace another who's time is up!

Asher
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Asher,

the stencils are (presumably) in almost all cases original work from the Artist. I have never seen places where you could buy such things. I cannot exclude this, but unlike the stickers, commercialization seems not to have penetrated this aspect of street art yet.

Stencils are quicker to apply, which certainly helps to avoid being caught.

There are other reasons - sharp, well delimited structures combined with different colors can have their own esthetics like in the below example:



They are very efficient in transporting strong (and often ironic) messages:



But they lack the esthetics like shown in this one (caricaturist approach as well, part of a series):


Who 15

Best regards,
Michael
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Venice this time

These two and the above 'Vietato Fumare' are from Venice.
Venice has a lot of street art, but you have to go to the less touristic places. I hope that I will have the occasion to explore more one day.




Best regards,
Michael
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
These two and the above 'Vietato Fumare' are from Venice.
Venice has a lot of street art, but you have to go to the less touristic places. I hope that I will have the occasion to explore more one day.
There's never enough time, as there food is good and one has to rush on foot from place to place or wait for the Vaporetto.



Face


Simple, maybe a finger to the rich or merely a free place to place one's art?








Don't what?

Don't park here, post papers here or just don't, "anything" here as a sarcastic finger to the property owners.

Asher.
 
Last edited:

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
A large wall mural outside a restaurant in Granada. I waited for the man to get in a perfect position where the text on the sign showed, but he was still off center for compositional value. He was walking at a brisk pace - so timing was crucial for what I wanted - I took the one shot only (other than the setup shot shown below).

Midday shot as can be seen by the totally blown out sidewalk where my watermark is. Only about 3 feet of shade under the overhang to keep the wall and man in perfect lighting (sun caught a little bit of his body, but not bad).

Olympus E-PL1 w/ 14-42 kit lens @ 25mm : f4.5 @ 1/500'th : 250 ISO (Shutter Priority Mode)



-----


I think that this shot below, taken just seconds before the man entered the scene (you can see a bit of his hand on the left side) - - - shows how much impact human content can have on a scenic view - - - at least from my point of view, seeing side by side captures - having the the human element or not, makes it or breaks it.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Michael Nagel

Active member
Asher - for the face I don't know, but I think that the juxtaposition with the tower was taken into account by the artist.

'Not here either' - well, the street was way too small for any kind of car, so it must have been something else...


Robert - I prefer the first one with the person walking in front of the wall. There is more life...


George - the butterflies are special.


Sometimes the little details are more intriguing than the big picture:




Best regards,
Michael
 

Joachim Bolte

New member
This one is also taken in Paris, to the west of the Pere-la-Chaise cemetery. I believe that was Bvd de Menilmontant... They have some extraordinary grafitti artists over there.




and I felt a bit like editing today... :)


 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Documenting street art can be a race against time. Things that seem to stay for long disappear from one day to the other. Great work is replaced by other work, usually good, but sometimes not that great.

This one was taken not very far from the place where I saw the three above. The picture was taken more than nine months ago.


Ballet


When I passed there again one week ago, I saw that somebody placed a flower bucket in front of it (the type you don't move once it is there).



Best regards,
Michael
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Paint on Steel Art Colour Burnt Orange (microscopic sized flakes of paint against weathered steel)








Burnt Paint at 30"x30" - this client considered this type of image as art anyway


 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Robert Watcher said:
Shadow Art - Colour

Shadow Art - Black and White

Paint on Steel Art Colour White

Paint on Steel Art Colour Burnt Orange (microscopic sized flakes of paint against weathered steel)
These are nice, but considering these as Street Art is a little bit of a stretch for me...

Best regards,
Michael
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
These are nice, but considering these as Street Art is a little bit of a stretch for me...

Best regards,
Michael
All visible from the street - found shots that I photographed while passing by (I did step inside for one or two - but even then, the building was being demolished and open to the elements). Could be a stretch though depending on how you look at it.
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
All visible from the street - found shots that I photographed while passing by (I did step inside for one or two - but even then, the building was being demolished and open to the elements). Could be a stretch though depending on how you look at it.
This goes even for the one shown in the living room? ;)

I think this definition coins it quite well. Just check the ones I singled out against it:
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Street_art

Best regards,
Michael
 
Top