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Strictly For The Birds

Tony Britton

Active member
Hello,

I wanted to share my favorite bird, and occasional duck, photos with you. I prefer portrait style captures whenever possible and utilize side-lighting in a vast majority of my photographs. All photos were taken hand-held and have not been cropped.



1. Double-crested Cormorant




2. Great Blue Heron




3. Black-crowned Night Heron



I hope you enjoy my collection.

Best regards,
Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Hello,

I wanted to share my favorite bird, and occasional duck, photos with you. I prefer portrait style captures whenever possible and utilize side-lighting in a vast majority of my photographs. All photos were taken hand-held and have not been cropped.



1. Double-crested Cormorant




2. Great Blue Heron




3. Black-crowned Night Heron



I hope you enjoy my collection.
Interesting style, Tony. I wouldn't have thought that landscape format would be such an harmonious fit for such portraits. But it's the commonality of the long beaks that make the case for this effective presentation. I know some birders use Better Beamer flash extenders to reach birds framed by their telephoto lenses.

So how do you light these so effectively. Is it just choosing the time of day and angle and a lot of waiting?

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Interesting style, Tony. I wouldn't have thought that landscape format would be such an harmonious fit for such portraits. But it's the commonality of the long beaks that make the case for this effective presentation. I know some birders use Better Beamer flash extenders to reach birds framed by their telephoto lenses.

So how do you light these so effectively. Is it just choosing the time of day and angle and a lot of waiting?

Asher
Hi Asher. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

The "look" or style I favor in my photography is mainly the marriage between side-lighting provided by early morning or late afternoon sunlight and the intentional use of "negative" exposure compensation. I do not use a flash or any other external light source. Fast shutter speeds ensure sharp images by minimizing hand-held camera shake. Like many photographers, I've simply embraced a style and set of strategies that allow me to consistently capture the types of images I find appealing. I know how I want the image to appear well before I press the shutter. Each day I'm learning the profound difference between making a photograph and taking a photograph.

Tony

"My wife and I make the perfect point-and-shoot photography team. She points and I shoot!"
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Here's a few more examples of the effect I like by combining side-lighting of the subject and negative exposure compensation. Hand-held, no cropping.


1. Great Blue Heron



2. Double-crested Cormorant



3. Black-crowned Night Heron



4. Green Heron



5. Wood Duck



6. Snowy Egret​

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Here's a few more examples of the effect I like by combining side-lighting of the subject and negative exposure compensation. Hand-held, no cropping.


1. Great Blue Heron



2. Double-crested Cormorant



3. Black-crowned Night Heron



4. Green Heron



5. Wood Duck



6. Snowy Egret​


Tony,

This style, (of negative exposure compensation and side light weighting), is very similar to the lighting I use for models against a black back drop. Now I will have to post more examples, LOL. I like the richer colors and the clear demarcation of form and removal of so much clutter!

Keep it up!

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tony,

This style, (of negative exposure compensation and side light weighting), is very similar to the lighting I use for models against a black back drop. Now I will have to post more examples, LOL. I like the richer colors and the clear demarcation of form and removal of so much clutter!

Keep it up!

Asher
Hi Asher,

Yes, while this side-lighting technique I use outdoors might not meet the precise criteria to qualify it as studio "Rembrandt Lighting" it's close enough for me!

Tony
 

Tony Britton

Active member
1. Snowy Egret Ballet



2. Double-crested Cormorant



3. Common Merganser



4. Ring-billed Gull



5. Great Egret



6. Green Heron

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tony,

This collection is both rich and educational for me. I promise to look up every single bird as each image here I know represents a huge investment in your time and skill to share with us all this abundant beauty.

This is quite amazing, but a small portion of the beauty we still have left on this wonderful
Planet!

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tony,

This collection is both rich and educational for me. I promise to look up every single bird as each image here I know represents a huge investment in your time and skill to share with us all this abundant beauty.

This is quite amazing, but a small portion of the beauty we still have left on this wonderful
Planet!

Asher
Thank you for your generous support of my contributions here. It's such an honor and privilege to stand in the presence of these beautiful birds, which truly are living works of art!

Tony
 

Tony Britton

Active member
I hope you'll enjoy this set. Hand-held, no cropping.


1. Snowy Egret



2. Red-tailed Hawk



3. Brown Pelican


4. Double-crested Cormorant



5. Snowy Egret



6. Red-shouldered Hawk

 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Tony,

I hope you'll enjoy this set. Hand-held, no cropping.
All stunning, each in its own way.

The Snowy Egret certainly takes one of the prizes!

People often mock these very convenient smaller-sensor cameras (Canon PowerShot SX40 and SX50) but we see here beautiful work from them.

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Hi, Tony,



All stunning, each in its own way.

The Snowy Egret certainly takes one of the prizes!

People often mock these very convenient smaller-sensor cameras (Canon PowerShot SX40 and SX50) but we see here beautiful work from them.

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
Thank you for taking the time to comment. I appreciate it very much.

Wishing you happiness and success in your photography.

Tony
 

Tony Britton

Active member
I hope you enjoy these. Hand-held, no cropping.

Tony


1. Double-crested Cormorant



2. Black-crowned Night Heron



3. Snowy Egret



4. Great Blue Heron



5. Black Oystercatcher



6. Red-shouldered Hawk

 

Tony Britton

Active member
Black & White For Your Delight!

A set of my favorite black & white conversions.


1. Great Blue Heron



2. Snowy Egret



3. Great Egret



4. Double-crested Cormorant



5. Snowy Egret



6. Great Blue Heron

 

Tony Britton

Active member
A few more wild bird photos I hope you'll enjoy. Hand-held, no cropping. Sony DSC-RX10 M3.

Great Blue Heron


Snowy Egret



Double-crested Cormorant
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tony,

I can’t say enough of how delighted we are to have you share your fabulous pictures with us. You seem to favor with Raptors and birds adjacent to water. Are you in a lake of river area that’s you “go to” shooting place, or you travel widely?

I commend you to look at the fine work here of Don Ferguson, Metal Airframe & Live birds, (USA), Doug Herr, (USA), Peter Dexter, (Colombia), Robert Watcher, (Canada), Chris Calohan, (USA), and others who also excel in fine bird photography

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
A few more wild bird photos I hope you'll enjoy. Hand-held, no cropping. Sony DSC-RX10 M3.

Great Blue Heron


Snowy Egret



Double-crested Cormorant
Tony,

it’s simply amazing to me that you succeed so well with the Delightful Sony RX10 M-3!

How do you manage with small birds in a tree and do you use a flash with a “Better Beamer” for birds in the shadows.

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tony,

it’s simply amazing to me that you succeed so well with the Delightful Sony RX10 M-3!

How do you manage with small birds in a tree and do you use a flash with a “Better Beamer” for birds in the shadows.

Asher
Thanks, Asher. The Sony is fantastic! I really don't have a keen interest in photographing small birds and I'm always looking for opportunities to photograph birds in partial shadow. My favorite image involves the use of side-light and a portrait capture.

Here's a few examples of what I most enjoy.

Rock Pigeons Canon SX50


Snowy Egret Nikon P610


Western Gull Sony DSC-RX10 M3


Black-crowned Night Heron Canon SX50


Great Blue Heron
Canon SX50


Western Gull Canon SX50
 
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Tony Britton

Active member
Here's a few more I hope you'll enjoy. Hand-held, no cropping.

Brown Pelican


Muscovy Duck


Brandt's Cormorant



Western Gull


Double-crested Cormorant
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tony,

Done far better than I’d have imagined. But how often were the longest focal lengths easily handheld?

Haven’t you been sorely tempted to use an Olympus MFT with a 600 mm equivalent superb lens?

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Asher,

I haven't had any real issues with photos taken at the extreme focal lengths with either camera. Every bird and animal photo I've ever taken were hand-held captures, with the majority at maximum focal length. Now, that's maximum focal lengths with subjects often less than 10 feet from me. When I decided which type of bird photo pleased me the most (portraits), I scouted location after location to find areas where birds such as herons and cormorants had best habituated to the presence of humans. Coastal harbors and lakes, for example. I can get ridiculously close to these birds and it has absolutely nothing to do with my anchovy-scented cologne! Honestly!

Best,

Tony
 

Tony Britton

Active member
A few wide-angle shots I hope you'll enjoy. Canon and Nikon superzooms. Hand-held, no cropping.

Allen's Hummingbird


Green Heron


Western Grebe


Great Egret


Snowy Egret


Brown Pelican
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
So many wonderful images to take in but I especially enjoy the portrait of the Snowy Egret where it appears he has stuck his toe in a n electric socket.:D
 

Tony Britton

Active member
So many wonderful images to take in but I especially enjoy the portrait of the Snowy Egret where it appears he has stuck his toe in a n electric socket.:D
Hi Peter,

Thanks so much for commenting. Yes, that Snowy is sporting quite a hairdo, or featherdo more precisely!

Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
We are so blessed with such a rich planet. Your work Tony is a showcase of unparalleled beauty!

I intend to gradually share these wonders with my grandchildren.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Hello,

I wanted to share my favorite bird, and occasional duck, photos with you. I prefer portrait style captures whenever possible and utilize side-lighting in a vast majority of my photographs. All photos were taken hand-held and have not been cropped.



1. Double-crested Cormorant




2. Great Blue Heron




3. Black-crowned Night Heron



I hope you enjoy my collection.

Best regards,
Tony
Tony,

These pictures are a joy to browse and
Your obvious dedication to presenting natural behaviors and the beauty in great detail comes through: a great contribution!

Thanks!

But this success not only points out your skill but in addition the need to upgrade our assessment of superzoom cameras.

Now that you are so experienced can you share where this system is limited. Have you commonly succeeded with “Birds in Flight“?

What ISO levels are usable with these systems as does one brand do better than another in image quality, robustness of the files you editing, low light focus, (what is low light here, (how many -EV)?

What would you recommend concentrating on the challenges of shooting small birds in trees?

Asher
 
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