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Doors! Handsome, beautiful, decayed, prison or palace, even stolen!

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Seems to have been magnificent at its prime! I wonder whether folk who visit it every day for worship just are so used to it that they don’t notice the paint peeling off, as to them, “Its always been like that!”

Or is it abandoned as a key placevof worship and now an administrative center with no funds?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Door With figures!


Antonio,

Such craftswork should be looked after better. I wish the the bronze figurines could be enlarged! Fabulous shot!

We see the same in Venice with the precious irreplaceable building’s along canals allowed to decay, but ground floors are decorated lavishly to entice entertain tourists.

We need to treasure and respect cultural heritages!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
James,

Interesting structure! Quite unusual

This looks like 1950’s building with concrete blocks. Not usual for homes. What’s the ironwork up on the left?

Do you have a wider picture to include more all around?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Jérôme,

I thought first from the Island of Malta! But could t find anything with such massive doors!

This magnificent structure needs a well endowed Christian community for such amazing epic architecture.

Is this the Jéronimos Monastery in Portugal?

Asher
 

James Lemon

Active member
James,

Interesting structure! Quite unusual

This looks like 1950’s building with concrete blocks. Not usual for homes. What’s the ironwork up on the left?

Do you have a wider picture to include more all around?

Asher
Sorry Asher but I don't have a wider one .

James
 

James Lemon

Active member
But do you know anything about the place. It doesn’t have a door number, so is it sone office of a workshop or pub?

Asher
Hi Asher

Now that you mention it ,no I don't know what goes on in there. There are a few other vendors near by that I have visited but this one is still a mystery. Soon they will all be torn down to make way for more progress,better built buildings with much improved efficiencies.

James
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
2525


Jérôme,

Such an investment in the magnificent sculpture of the gargoyle. So what have folk been taught about such embellishments to an already powerful building?

The quality and scale of the art is extraordinary.

But what does it really mean in the culture of the builders and dreamers and this generation?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Once again, Antonio, you bring peace, reflection and solace!


2526


I wish the brightest light might be tamed a little if you still have the RAW files.

What are the letters on the tile work? Is that the Latin year of restoration of the building?

There seems to be two different building materials: stone and plaster covered brick!

Tell us about this quiet place?

Asher
 

Antonio Correia

Well-known member
This is in Guatemala, Asher.
I am afraid that I can' recover the light from the white area on the ground. I made a stacking on camera but even then nothing appeared. I should have done it harder, with more exposures.
Anyway, this photo was started from the best exposed one and I erased the others.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
This is in Guatemala, Asher.
I am afraid that I can' recover the light from the white area on the ground. I made a stacking on camera but even then nothing appeared. I should have done it harder, with more exposures.
Anyway, this photo was started from the best exposed one and I erased the others.
Damn good result I say.

It was meant to be!

It’s the light of God that can’t be tamed so I wouldn’t want to upset her!

But this does point out that in rare occasions extra wide dynamic range with high bit rate sensors is advantageous!

So did you bracket and how did you make the settings?

Asher
 

Antonio Correia

Well-known member
I bracket but wanted to try one of those "non-bracket".
I have chosen the one with the best histogram even if it was a bit overexposed on small areas like the one you mentioned.
I toned down the hole light giving emphasis to the opening.
I am not sure if the stacked bracket photos would be better. I should have tried... next time
Some work has been done in LR and some in CC
 
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